Showing posts with label Haywood. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Haywood. Show all posts

Wednesday, 19 March 2014

Fearless Females 2014: Surprising Fact: Where Audrey Ball Came From

When I began tracing my family history, it seemed as though all my mother's side of the family came from Devon.  Audrey Ball HAYWOOD was born and married in Devon; her parents ditto; all her siblings ditto; uncles and aunts ditto...

Until I came upon a surprising fact - actually, several surprising facts.

Her mother lived for a time in Northern Ireland, and on Achill (an island off the coast of Ireland).
Her maternal grandmother came from Sussex.
Her paternal grandparents came from Warwickshire.
Her maternal great-grandparents (and further back) came from Mevagissey in Cornwall.

No longer could I say that the family stayed in one place for generations!





Once again, in honour of National Women’s History Month, Lisa Alzo of The Accidental Genealogist blog presents Fearless Females: 31 Blogging Prompts to Celebrate Women’s History Month.  I know this is really US-centric - but that's not going to stop me honouring my own Fearless Females...  

Wednesday, 1 January 2014

Ros N Haywood, Author

Ros N Haywood  



I was a bit absent from this blog during 2013 (sorry about that).  The reason was: I published my first book!  BLUE RUBY is available from Amazon (not sure if I can link here, or if that constitutes advertising).  It was followed in December by SCARLET DIAMOND (same caveat), and I am currently editing PURPLE OPAL for publication in the Spring.

But one of my goals is to post more frequently and regularly here. There are lots of memes to participate in, the Family History Writing Challenge in February, Rootstech, and writing about Fearless Females in March .  Followed by the A-Z Challenge in April, webinars to attend and courses to study - genealogy will be at the forefront of my priorities!

Thank you to all my followers and readers who have stuck with me during 2013 - and I wish you all the best for 2014.

Tuesday, 15 October 2013

Tuesday's Tip: Note the Neighbours

Following on from last week's "Motivation Monday" post about NOT using the scattergun approach, today's "Tuesday's Tip" may seem like I have my wires crossed somewhere.  For today's "Tip" is to always look at the neighbours when you are reading something like a census return. 

Years ago, I was searching for my gg grandfather, John HAYWOOD, and noticed that in the house where he lived, was a Walter HAYWOOD.  Now, I had no Walter HAYWOOD in my notes - but I wrote him down anyway.  Some time later, I learned that I *did* have a Walter - but it was just that I didn't know it at the time. 

Now I look back at those same censuses, and with 20-20 hindsight I can pick out his sister, his niece, and other relatives.  So, if you want 20-20 hindsight vision before the future has happened - always note the neighbours.

Monday, 14 October 2013

Motivation Monday: Grandparents

Julie Boucher of the Angler's Rest blog, has started a 15-month set of weekly prompts to create The Book of Me, Written by You.  She describes it as "...not just about genealogy or family history. It is about a personal journey; a journey of rediscovery of yourself and perhaps your loved ones through your eyes."

This week's Prompt is for you to write about your grandparents.
  • What were their names? Edmund George HAYWOOD, Elsie Beatrice BLAGDON (my paternal grandparents), William Hubert BALL, and Minda Mary EDGCOMBE (my maternal grandparents).  Yes, they were married, but as a genealogist I have grown so accustomed to noting ladies down with their maiden names...
  • Where were they from?  Edmund George and Elsie Beatrice were from Millbrook, Cornwall, UK; William Hubert was from Kingsbridge, Devon and Minda Mary was from Ringmore, also Devon.
I wrote about them in my post on 3 February here.  I was in the middle of another year's "Family History Writing Challenge" (which happens every February), writing "Faith and Silk" and stumbling AGAIN.  So writing about my grandparents was a fresh start.

"The Family History Writing Challenge is an opportunity for all genealogists, to set some valuable time aside for the next 2[8] days and commit to writing their family history stories. No more excuses. There are so many benefits to writing your family history."
http://familyhistorywritingchallenge.blogspot.co.uk/2012/01/welcome.html

I like challenges.  Perhaps I should like motivations first...

Sunday, 13 October 2013

Sunday's Obituary: Albion and Elizabeth Charlotte HAYWOOD 1913

The Western Times, 16 April 1913: Sad Occurrence: Bovey Funeral Followed by Widow's Death

The funeral took place on Monday of Mr Albion Haywood, of Pottery [my ggg uncle].  Deceased was carried into the Baptist Chapel and interred at the cemetery.  The chief mourners were Mr Norman Haywood, Mr Edgar Haywood (sons), Mrs French (sister), Mr John Haywood, Mr H Haywood (brothers), Mrs J Haywood, Mrs H Haywood (sisters-in-law), Mr and Mrs Clampitt, Miss Vera Haywood, Miss Pearse and Mr Boyne.  A good number of club members attended to show their last token of respect.  Rev. J R Way conducted the service.  There were several beautiful wreaths.

The widow, Mrs Albion Haywood, died yesterday morning.  Much sympathy is expressed for the two sons in their double bereavement in less than a week.





Sunday, 24 March 2013

Fearless Females 2013: Day 24: Physical Traits

Do you share any physical resemblance or personality trait with one of your female ancestors? Who? What is it?

That's an easy one...and one which makes me sigh.  When I was a baby, I had gappy teeth - and so did my paternal grandmother (although the gaps weren't in the same places).  Now that I am in my fifties, I have her excess weight...

Elsie Beatrice Blagdon (Haywood) McNally, my paternal grandmother, was born on 22 July 1908 in Millbrook, Cornwall, and died 2 February 1975 in Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire.

RNH and Elsie Beatrice BLAGDON 1960
Once again, in honour of National Women’s History Month, Lisa Alzo of The Accidental Genealogist blog presents Fearless Females: 31 Blogging Prompts to Celebrate Women’s History Month.  I know this is really US-centric - but that's not going to stop me honouring my own Fearless Females...

Thursday, 21 March 2013

Fearless Females 2013: Day 21: Tender Moments in Reading


Describe a tender moment one of your female ancestors shared with you or another family member.

When my mother, Audrey Ball HAYWOOD, passed away suddenly in 1995, one of my clearest memories is one day going to the local supermarket to buy some bread, milk, whatever - and the girl at the checkout saying, "I remember your Mum; she taught me to read."  (My mother used to work as a teaching assistant at St John's Primary School in Glastonbury, Somerset).  To me, that is one of the proudest moments of my life.

I remember her teaching me to read, too.  I still have a recording, converted from a reel-to-reel tape (showing my age here!) of a very small me, aged 4, reading Beatrix Potter's "Peter Rabbit" in a very posh little voice.  And yet, you can hear in the background, when I stumbled on some of the larger (and therefore harder) words, my mother's voice gently prompting me with the correct pronunciation.

One of the most tender moments we shared.

Audrey Ball HAYWOOD, 1990s


Once again, in honour of National Women’s History Month, Lisa Alzo of The Accidental Genealogist blog presents Fearless Females: 31 Blogging Prompts to Celebrate Women’s History Month.  I know this is really US-centric - but that's not going to stop me honouring my own Fearless Females...

Tuesday, 19 March 2013

Fearless Females 2013: Day 19: Surprising Fact

Have you discovered a surprising fact about one of your female ancestors? What was it and how did you learn it?

One of the witnesses to the marriage of my paternal great great grandparents - John HAYWOOD and Johanna MURCH - on 30 September 1869 in Ottery St Mary was a lady called Jane PAGE.  I had never heard of her, but thought perhaps she was a friend of the family.

Johanna died young in 1875, aged only 31, from complications following childbirth.  John, with three small boys to look after, one of whom was an infant, quickly remarried, this time to a lady called Eliza DREWS.  The couple stayed married until Eliza died in 1902, aged 56.

Then the 1911 census was released, and I searched it to find John - only to find that he had married for a third time.  I searched other records for his marriage, and found that he had remarried only a year after Eliza had died - to a lady called Jane PAGE, the witness at his first wedding (the one to Johanna).  Was she more than just a family friend, then, I wondered?  She was born in North London, Middlesex.  What was she doing in Devon?



Once again, in honour of National Women’s History Month, Lisa Alzo of The Accidental Genealogist blog presents Fearless Females: 31 Blogging Prompts to Celebrate Women’s History Month.  I know this is really US-centric - but that's not going to stop me honouring my own Fearless Females...

Monday, 11 March 2013

Fearless Females 2013: Day 11: Martha Randle and Johanna Murch


Did you have any female ancestors who died young?

Martha RANDLE (my maternal great great great grandmother) was christened 29 August 1802 at St Lawrence's church, Foleshill, Warwickshire, and married Adam BUCKINGHAM on 11 June 1821 in Astley, also in Warwickshire.  Why are they in a blog devoted to Devon and Cornwall?  Because they are my ancestors, that's why, and their line eventually wandered down to the West Country.

However, Martha died young, aged only 33, and was buried 7 June 1835.  She had already had five children, and the date of birth of the sixth, my ancestor Joseph, is also 1835.  I wonder if this birth was too much for her.  This reminds me of Johanna Murch HAYWOOD (my paternal great great grandmother), who was born 4 February 1844 and died on 17 December 1875 from exhaustion 8 days after the birth of her third child, Ernest.

Martha died before the beginning of civil registration, so there is no death certificate I can get from the General Register Office to show her cause of death.  Is there anywhere else I can look?



Once again, in honour of National Women’s History Month, Lisa Alzo of The Accidental Genealogist blog presents Fearless Females: 31 Blogging Prompts to Celebrate Women’s History Month.  I know this is really US-centric - but that's not going to stop me honouring my own Fearless Females...

Sunday, 10 March 2013

Fearless Females 2013: Day 10: Religion

I am participating in the Fearless Females theme to honour National Women's History Month.  Today we were asked what role religion played in our families; as far back as I have researched on the MURCH line, women either married into a Nonconformist religious atmosphere, or were searching for the truth themselves.  Here they are in Ottery St Mary, Bovey Tracey, and Chudleigh (all in Devon), beginning with my 6th great-grandmother::

  • Elizabeth Bastin: bap 1720, married Gideon Murch 21 July 1744
  • Margaret Marshall,: b abt 1749, mar Samuel Murch, previously married Richard Littley (very religious family who appear regularly in the Nonconformist records) on 26 December 1774
  • Eleanor Bending: bur 1834, married to Samuel Murch 14 March 1791 (2nd wife after Margaret died)
  • Mary Bending: baptised on Boxing Day 1785, married Samuel Murch 16 September 1799
  • Johanna Yeates married Samuel Murch 5 August 1828
  • Johanna Murch and John Haywood, married 30 September 1869 in Independent Meeting House, Ottery St Mary, Devon, UK.

This post originally appeared in Fearless Females 2011 on this blog.



Once again, in honour of National Women’s History Month, Lisa Alzo of The Accidental Genealogist blog presents Fearless Females: 31 Blogging Prompts to Celebrate Women’s History Month.  I know this is really US-centric - but that's not going to stop me honouring my own Fearless Females...

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